Google expands security bug bounty program to Chrome OS

Google Chrome OS logoGoogle says its bug bounty program, which awards hefty cash rewards for privately reported security vulnerabilities in its Chrome browser and online services, has been such a success that the company will expand it to include Chrome OS.

To date, Google has shelled out $729,000 under the program, which was initiated two years ago for its Chrome browser and 15 months ago for YouTube, Blogger, and its other Web services. Over the course of the latter program, Google received 1,100 legitimate reports from more than 200 individuals, Adam Mein, technical program manager on Google's security team, blogged. Of the 730 bugs that qualified for a reward, about half were contained in software developed by one of 50 or so companies Google has acquired. In all, Google has paid $429,000 under that program.

The remaining $300,000 was paid under the older bounty program for the Chrome browser, according to a separate post published on Google's Chromium blog. Reported flaws have covered the gamut of browser components, including Windows kernel and Mac OS X graphics libraries, code for the underlying Chromium and WebKit browser libraries, and open-source libraries such as libxml and ffmpeg. The post said "dozens of researchers" had submitted reports.

Google said it will now open up the program to those reporting "high-severity Chromium OS security bugs" that are present when the system's developer mode is turned off. Eligible issues include renderer sandbox escapes using Linux kernel flaws, memory corruptions or cross-origin issues inside the Pepper Flash plugin, and violations of the verified boot path will all qualify.

Started in early 2010, the bug bounty program for the Chrome browser was one of the first times a software developer had agreed to pay cash rewards in return for vulnerability reports. (Mozilla and DNS software developer Daniel J. Bernstein both preceded Google.) In July, Facebook initiated its own rewards program. So far, Microsoft, Apple and Oracle have declined to pay rewards, despite the considerable—and free—help they receive from some of the world's most talented security researchers.

Source: Ars Technica

Tags: Chrome OS, Google

Comments
Add comment

Your name:
Sign in with:
or
Your comment:


Enter code:

E-mail (not required)
E-mail will not be disclosed to the third party


Last news

 
Consumer group recommends iPhone 8 over anniversary model
 
LTE connections wherever you go and instant waking should come to regular PCs, too
 
That fiction is slowly becoming a reality
 
The Snapdragon 845 octa-core SoC includes the Snapdragon X20 LTE modem
 
Human moderators can help make YouTube a safer place for everyone
 
Google says Progressive Web Apps are the future of app-like webpages
 
All 2018 models to sport the 'notch'
 
The biggest exchange in South Korea, where the BTC/KRW pair is at $14,700 now
The Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017) Review
The evolution of the successful smartphone, now with a waterproof body and USB Type-C
February 7, 2017 /
Samsung Galaxy TabPro S - a tablet with the Windows-keyboard
The first Windows-tablet with the 12-inch display Super AMOLED
June 7, 2016 /
Keyboards for iOS
Ten iOS keyboards review
July 18, 2015 /
Samsung E1200 Mobile Phone Review
A cheap phone with a good screen
March 8, 2015 / 4
Creative Sound Blaster Z sound card review
Good sound for those who are not satisfied with the onboard solution
September 25, 2014 / 2
Samsung Galaxy Gear: Smartwatch at High Price
The first smartwatch from Samsung - almost a smartphone with a small body
December 19, 2013 /
 
 

News Archive

 
 
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      




Poll

Do you use microSD card with your phone?
or leave your own version in comments (4)