Microsoft to drop Windows 10 S as a stand-alone product

Windows 10 logoWindows 10 S was supposed to be Microsoft's firm answer to Chrome OS, offering comparable security (by limiting you to Microsoft Store apps) while running more powerful software. However, its implementation for home users has been ham-fisted: you have to unlock Windows 10 Pro if you want more freedom, which should (eventually) cost money and is clearly overkill for many people. That's about to change. Both Thurrott and Neowin have discovered that Microsoft is dropping Windows 10 S as a stand-alone product for everyday users in favor of an S Mode, which is already available for the enterprise crowd.

The plan is reportedly to make S Mode available for most versions of Windows 10 (with new Core+ and Workstation variants being the exceptions). The cost of unlocking full access would depend on what you're running: Windows 10 Home S users could unlock to the regular Home release for free, while those using Windows 10 Pro S would have to pay the previously mentioned $49. You wouldn't be forced to cough up cash just because that 10 S PC you bought feels too restrictive.

There's no firm timetable for when the switch would happen, but Thurrott understands that a shakeup of Windows 10 prices for partners, which includes S Mode, will take effect between April 2nd and May 1st. We've asked Microsoft for comment and will let you know if it can confirm any details.

This isn't necessarily a rejection of Windows 10 S as a concept, although data in the documents suggests it has had a mixed reception. About 60 percent of users with third-party 10 S PCs stick to the software, but 60 percent of those who switch do so immediately. In other words, people who buy Windows 10 S machines usually know what they want. The problem, as you may have noticed, is that these are third-party computers -- it's likely that Microsoft's own Surface Laptop would skew the numbers. A shift away from a release could be an acknowledgment that 10 S works better as a settings toggle than a separate product.

Source: Engadget

Tags: Microsoft, OSes, Windows 10

Comments
Add comment

Your name:
Sign in with:
or
Your comment:


Enter code:

E-mail (not required)
E-mail will not be disclosed to the third party


Last news

 
The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1180 will be Turing-based with a 12nm FinFET die shrink
 
This only works on posts made by profiles that are public
 
 
The device will be standalone and based on a Qualcomm chipset
 
Apple plans on offering a cheaper smart speaker that will be priced at $199
 
Chrome will adopt a new approach to indicating site security
 
Data shows they are leading smartphone sale worldwide
 
Is this an error or it is really happening?
The Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017) Review
The evolution of the successful smartphone, now with a waterproof body and USB Type-C
February 7, 2017 /
Samsung Galaxy TabPro S - a tablet with the Windows-keyboard
The first Windows-tablet with the 12-inch display Super AMOLED
June 7, 2016 /
Keyboards for iOS
Ten iOS keyboards review
July 18, 2015 /
Samsung E1200 Mobile Phone Review
A cheap phone with a good screen
March 8, 2015 / 4
Creative Sound Blaster Z sound card review
Good sound for those who are not satisfied with the onboard solution
September 25, 2014 / 2
Samsung Galaxy Gear: Smartwatch at High Price
The first smartwatch from Samsung - almost a smartphone with a small body
December 19, 2013 /
 
 

News Archive

 
 
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  




Poll

Do you use microSD card with your phone?
or leave your own version in comments (10)