Microsoft continues to experiment with Windows power management

Microsoft logoOne of the things that Microsoft does with its Insider Preview builds of Windows is run experiments. A couple of experiments that were briefly available during the development of the Creators Update are back, as Microsoft develops new power management capabilities.

The new feature is called Power Throttling, although this name is just temporary. Power Throttling was originally trialed in the Creators Update preview build 15002. When used in conjunction with an Intel Skylake or Kaby Lake processor—and only those processors, for the moment—the system will classify certain applications as being "background work." If a background task demands processor time, Windows will avoid kicking up the processor into a high performance mode, instead keeping it in its low power state. Only when a foreground application—or certain classes of important background task, such as music apps—needs processor time will the processor have its speed increased.

Microsoft continues to experiment with Windows power management

Power Throttling is controlled by new settings in the Settings app—you can set them so that Windows will never treat certain apps as being background apps if you prefer—and by a second Creators Update-era experiment that has been resurrected. Build 15014 included a power management slider that appeared when you clicked the battery icon in the system notification area.

The original slider wasn't actually connected to anything—the company was just using it to work out some of the user interface details. But now it's back, and this time around it actually does something. Slide it all the way to the right, for maximum performance, and Power Throttling will be disabled. The further the slider is moved to the left, the more Windows will try to save battery life.

In future builds, Microsoft intends to provide APIs so that apps can make sure that throttling treats them appropriately. This kind of throttling is also disabled when systems are plugged into the wall, though most other power management features remain active.

Source: Ubergizmo

Tags: Microsoft, security

Comments
Add comment

Your name:
Sign in with:
or
Your comment:


Enter code:

E-mail (not required)
E-mail will not be disclosed to the third party


Last news

 
The rear sensors might use a different tech than the iPhone X's front array
 
ing-Chi Kuo of KGI says the two models with OLED panels will basically have the same top of the line innards
 
This means Apple now commands 23% of the wearable market
 
Linux on Galaxy adds convergence capabilities to your phone
 
The Vive Focus is powered by the advanced features of the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 VR Platform
 
YouTube is now removing the ability for creators to promote videos
 
Microsoft says that it will be very simple to port across a list of contacts
 
But Broadcom is still "fully committed" to the acquisition
The Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017) Review
The evolution of the successful smartphone, now with a waterproof body and USB Type-C
February 7, 2017 /
Samsung Galaxy TabPro S - a tablet with the Windows-keyboard
The first Windows-tablet with the 12-inch display Super AMOLED
June 7, 2016 /
Keyboards for iOS
Ten iOS keyboards review
July 18, 2015 /
Samsung E1200 Mobile Phone Review
A cheap phone with a good screen
March 8, 2015 / 4
Creative Sound Blaster Z sound card review
Good sound for those who are not satisfied with the onboard solution
September 25, 2014 / 2
Samsung Galaxy Gear: Smartwatch at High Price
The first smartwatch from Samsung - almost a smartphone with a small body
December 19, 2013 /
 
 

News Archive

 
 
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  




Poll

Do you use microSD card with your phone?
or leave your own version in comments (4)