Reported “backdoor” in WhatsApp is in fact a feature, defenders say

WhatsApp logoThe Guardian roiled security professionals everywhere on Friday when it published an article claiming a backdoor in Facebook's WhatsApp messaging service allows attackers to intercept and read encrypted messages. It's not a backdoor—at least as that term is defined by most security experts. Most would probably agree it's not even a vulnerability. Rather, it's a limitation in what cryptography can do in an app that caters to more than 1 billion users.

At issue is the way WhatsApp behaves when an end user's encryption key changes. By default, the app will use the new key to encrypt messages without ever informing the sender of the change. By enabling a security setting, users can configure WhatsApp to notify the sender that a recently transmitted message used a new key.

Critics of Friday's Guardian post, and most encryption practitioners, argue such behavior is common in encryption apps and often a necessary requirement. Among other things, it lets existing WhatsApp users who buy a new phone continue an ongoing conversation thread.

Tobias Boelter, a Ph.D. candidate researching cryptography and security at the University of California at Berkeley, told the Guardian that the failure to obtain a sender's explicit permission before using the new key challenged the often-repeated claim that not even WhatsApp or its owner Facebook can read encrypted messages sent through the service. He first reported the weakness to WhatsApp last April. In an interview on Friday, he stood by the backdoor characterization.

"At the time I discovered it, I thought it was not a big deal... and they will fix it," he told Ars. "The fact that they still haven't fixed it yet makes me wonder why."

Source: Ars Technica

Tags: security, WhatsApp

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