New Android lockscreen hack gives attackers full access to locked devices

Android logoSoftware bugs that allow attackers to bypass smartphone lockscreens are common enough for both Android and iOS devices, but like a fender bender on the highway, many of us can't resist the urge to gawk anyway. There's a newly disclosed way for someone who has a few uninterrupted moments with a handset running most versions of Android 5.x to gain complete control of the device and all the data stored on it.

The hack involves dumping an extremely long string into the password field after swiping open the camera from a locked phone. Unless updated in the past few days, devices running 5.0 to 5.1.1 will choke on the unwieldy number of characters and unlock, even though the password is incorrect. From there, the attacker can do anything with the phone the rightful owner can do.

The following video demonstrates the attack in action. The technique begins by adding a large number of characters to the emergency call window and then copying them to the Android clipboard. (Presumably, there are other ways besides the emergency number screen to buffer a sufficiently large number of characters.) The hacker then swipes open the camera from the locked phone, accesses the options menu, and pastes the characters into the resulting password prompt. Instead of returning an error message, vulnerable handsets unlock.

The vulnerability has been fixed in the "LMY48M" Android 5.1.1 build Google released last week for the Nexus 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10. But as most people know, it can take months or years for updates to hit the masses, and some devices never receive security patches. Indeed, neither of the Nexus 5 phones this Ars reporter uses have received the over-the-air build update from last week.

Fortunately, the vulnerability was introduced in version 5, so the number of affected handsets is only a small fraction of the overall Android user base. Vulnerable users who can't get an update or don't want to wait for one to become available can switch to a PIN or pattern-based lockscreen, neither of which is susceptible to the hack. And while we're on this topic of Android lock patterns, readers may be interested in recently presented research showing that many of them are surprisingly predictable.

Source: Ars Technica

Tags: Android, OSes

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