Chrome + Firefox = BFF with cross-browser video talks

WebRTC logoThe latest beta versions of Chrome and Firefox can make high-definition video calls to one another, thanks to a joint effort by Mozilla and Google to support WebRTC interoperability.

Mozilla and Google made the joint announcements yesterday, while demonstrating a video call:

WebRTC is a plugin-free, real-time audio and video communication specification. The technology and specification are in the early stages of development, which means simply supporting the current version of the spec isn't enough to ensure interoperability. Extra work must be done.

"RTCPeerConnection (also known simply as PeerConnection or PC) interoperability means that developers can now create Firefox WebRTC applications that make direct audio/video calls to Chrome WebRTC applications without having to install a third-party plugin," Mozilla said. "Because the functionality is now baked into the browser, users can avoid problems with first-time installs and buggy plugins, and developers can deploy their apps much more easily and universally."

Google noted that, "thanks to the work and participation of the W3C and IETF communities in developing the platform, Chrome and Firefox can now communicate by using standard technologies such as the Opus and VP8 codecs for audio and video, DTLS-SRTP for encryption, and ICE for networking."

You can try Chrome/Firefox cross-browser calls yourself at the WebRTC demo site. You'll need the current beta version of Chrome and Firefox Nightly for Desktop.

If you're a developer looking to include cross-browser video talks in an application, Google pointed out a few sources of information: "You can look at the source code of the AppRTC demo, a library that makes writing cross-browser WebRTC apps a snap, and a document detailing some of the minor differences between browsers."

For now, this is Chrome- and Firefox-only. As we noted in previous articles, Microsoft is going its own way with a proposed spec called CU-RTC-Web.

Source: Ars Technica

Tags: browsers, Chrome, Firefox, Google, Mozilla

Comments
Add comment

Your name:
Sign in with:
or
Your comment:


Enter code:

E-mail (not required)
E-mail will not be disclosed to the third party


Last news

 
A recent test done charging speeds offered by the Huawei Mate 20 Pro was extremely slow
 
Google has announced that it will start to predict flight delays, using a combination of historic flight information
 
The Huawei P30 and P30 Pro are expected to follow the suit of the regular Mate 20
 
And it’s all possible thanks to a Bing search result
 
Microsoft 365 is a monthly subscription service that includes Windows 10
 
All thanks to Microsoft Flow integration, it seems
 
AI was the hottest trend in 2018, but now 2019 and 5G will be the buzzword
 
A lawsuit was filed on Friday in the US District Court of Northern California by a couple of plaintiffs who accuse Apple of falsely advertising
The Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017) Review
The evolution of the successful smartphone, now with a waterproof body and USB Type-C
February 7, 2017 /
Samsung Galaxy TabPro S - a tablet with the Windows-keyboard
The first Windows-tablet with the 12-inch display Super AMOLED
June 7, 2016 /
Keyboards for iOS
Ten iOS keyboards review
July 18, 2015 /
Samsung E1200 Mobile Phone Review
A cheap phone with a good screen
March 8, 2015 / 4
Creative Sound Blaster Z sound card review
Good sound for those who are not satisfied with the onboard solution
September 25, 2014 / 2
Samsung Galaxy Gear: Smartwatch at High Price
The first smartwatch from Samsung - almost a smartphone with a small body
December 19, 2013 /
 
 

News Archive

 
 
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     




Poll

Do you use microSD card with your phone?
or leave your own version in comments (11)