Hitachi, Opnext Developed Receiver For 100Gbit/s Ethernet

Hitachi, Ltd. and Opnext, Inc. today announced the development of a highly sensitive high-speed 25Gbit/s receiver for the 100Gbit/s Ethernet standard being discussed for next-generation high-speed optical networks.

Focusing on practicality and cost-effectiveness, the receiver module uses a coaxial package and achieves both high-speed and high-responsitivity by using a back-illuminated PD (photodiode) with a highly reflective reflector.

Working together, Hitachi and Opnext displayed a100Gbit/s 10km SMF (single mode fiber) CFP MSA transceiver using the newly developed receiver in combination with a 1.3?m-range 4-channel 25Gbit/s EA/DFB (electro-absorption modulator integrated distribution feedback) laser developed based on Hitachi's and Opnext's advanced technology as the light source. This transceiver achieves the sensitivity requirements of IEEE P802.3ba 100GBASE-LR4 standard being discussed. The receiver developed is expected to become a key component in this international standard and support next generation high speed interface technology.

"The first step to achieving a 1.3?m-range 25Gbit/s WDM optical transceiver was the announcement of a 25Gbit/s EA/DFB laser suitable for the 100Gbit/s Ethernet, and verification of 12km optical transmission, which Hitachi and Opnext introduced at OFC/NFOEC 2008. This year, Hitachi and Opnext announced the development of a cost-effective 25Gbit/s optical receiver for the 100Gbit/s Ethernet, overcoming several technical issues,? said Dr. Masahiro Aoki, department manager, Nanoelectronics Research Department, Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd.

A study by the IEEE High Speed Study Group (HSSG) showed that by the year 2010, the bandwidth required in core networking will be best satisfied by 100Gbit/s interfaces. In preparation, the IEEE 802.3ba taskforce is currently discussing specifications for the 100Gbit/s Ethernet, for which 1.3?m-range 4-channel 25Gbit/s WDM (wavelength division multiplexing) 10km SMF transmission has been decided by the task force as the most attractive technology. This represents a ten-fold increase in speed from the current 10Gbit/s Ethernet standard.

Verification tests using an experimental transceiver, based on the newly developed receiver in combination with an EA/DBF laser previously developed, not only satisfied signal levels required for 100Gbit/s Ethernet but also confirmed 25Gbit/s 10km SMF transmission.

Source: CDRINFO

Tags: Ethernet, Hitachi

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