World’s first 8K TV broadcasts begin for Rio 2016 Olympics

World’s first 8K TV broadcasts begin for Rio 2016 OlympicsThe world's first broadcast using 8K TV technology has begun on Japan's public channel NHK. With a resolution of 7680×4320, "Super Hi-Vision" as the company calls it—don't worry, the name won't catch on—has about four times the detail of a 4K broadcast, or 16 times what you're probably watching at home (normal HD, 1920×1080).

The 8K broadcast will be tested over the next five days, and from August 6 it will be used to broadcast parts of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, which are being filmed in 8K by special NHK cameras.

Of course, viewing an 8K broadcast will be rather difficult even in Japan, as none of the equipment required to receive and display the 8K signal has yet been commercially released. Instead, NHK has set up two special 8K viewing theatres in Tokyo and Osaka for the duration of the trial. For really determined home users, Sharp apparently sells an 85-inch 8K TV for about £120,000 (about $160,000), but I couldn't find it in stock anywhere.

NHK will broadcast the 8K signal via satellite. To get the data rate down to a level that can actually be handled by the satellite, NHK is using an 8K codec system that uses the new HEVC/H.265 coding scheme. The exact data-rate isn't known, but it'll probably be somewhere between 50 and 200Mbps, depending on the frame rate, with the spec allowing for up to 120FPS.

NHK's Super Hi-Vision spec also packages up 22.2-channel audio with the broadcast, which will add a fair bit to the data rate. NHK has had to develop its entire 8K stack from start to finish—the cameras, lenses, 22.2 audio-mixing system, the other tooling that a new format requires, the codecs, the receivers, and so on. Since 2002 the company has been slowly ticking off each of the boxes required to film, produce, and broadcast content in 8K. In 2005, NHK transmitted transmitted a live 8K feed over fibre; in 2008 it standardised the 22.2 audio scheme; in 2010 it unveiled an 8K video camera; in 2011 it showed off an 85-inch 8K TV; and in 2012 NHK filmed some of the London Olympics in 8K.

There will eventually be terrestrial (i.e. free-to-air digital TV) and cable transmission of 8K broadcasts, but that is not coming quite yet, though they have been tested successfully. The end goal is for 8K broadcast tech to be completely mature by 2020, when the Olympics will be in Tokyo. 8K displays should cost less than a house by that point, too.

Source: Ars Technica

Tags: 8K, Television

Add comment

Your name:
Sign in with:
Your comment:

Enter code:

E-mail (not required)
E-mail will not be disclosed to the third party

Last news

A mobile hotspot in Australia will be capable of hitting gigabit speeds on the go
A new game could be in the works as Blizzard appears to have been hiring for a Diablo-related project
Nokia CEO Rajeev Suri will speak at MWC 2017
However what if you could go way, way back?
The Helio P15 packs an octa-core Cortex-A53 processor clocked at 2.2GHz
Samsung claims up to 27-percent higher performance or 40-percent lower power
Preliminary data for October shows another Windows 10 boom
Samsung Galaxy TabPro S - a tablet with the Windows-keyboard
The first Windows-tablet with the 12-inch display Super AMOLED
June 7, 2016 /
Keyboards for iOS
Ten iOS keyboards review
July 18, 2015 /
Samsung E1200 Mobile Phone Review
A cheap phone with a good screen
March 8, 2015 / 4
Creative Sound Blaster Z sound card review
Good sound for those who are not satisfied with the onboard solution
September 25, 2014 / 2
Samsung Galaxy Gear: Smartwatch at High Price
The first smartwatch from Samsung - almost a smartphone with a small body
December 19, 2013 /
HP Slate 7 is a 7-inch Android 4 Tablet PC with good sound
A cost-effective, 7-inch tablet PC from a renowned manufacturer
October 25, 2013 / 4

News Archive



Do you use microSD card with your phone?
or leave your own version in comments