Project Ara will be controlled by Google and could extend beyond phones

Google logoProject Ara finally looks like it will be released to the public, but the modular phone from Google is not quite the same as what we originally thought. The most hardcore users may be disappointed by that, but Google is detailing the project to clarify what to expect and what not to expect from the first generation of modular phones.

Google answered questions from The Verge and some of the info was a bit disappointing, like the fact that not everything would be modular on an Ara device. Google confirmed that the display, processor and RAM would not be swappable, which puts a major caveat on Google's claims that Ara phones would be "future proof". Google said this decision was made because the vast majority of users don't care about those options, which is undoubtedly true, though not representative of our readership.

Project Ara will be controlled by Google and could extend beyond phones

Google also confirmed that it would be making the Project Ara bases in house and is "embracing" the idea that Ara is a true "Google Phone". Google will also be keeping tight control over the modules made by others. Modules made by third-parties will need to be approved by Google and include Google code in order to be able to interact with an Ara phone. Additionally, the modules will be sold directly through Google with Google taking a "small cut" of each sale. This means there will be no "grey market" for Ara modules.

Despite all of this, Google still claims Ara will be an "open platform" that anyone can build upon. Google will provide support for manufacturers and developers who want to make Ara modules, and Google said it is looking into "innovation on form factors" meaning Ara modules could be used in a wide range of electronic devices.

Source: phoneArena

Tags: Google, Project Ara, smartphones

Add comment

Your name:
Sign in with:
Your comment:

Enter code:

E-mail (not required)
E-mail will not be disclosed to the third party

Last news

A mobile hotspot in Australia will be capable of hitting gigabit speeds on the go
A new game could be in the works as Blizzard appears to have been hiring for a Diablo-related project
Nokia CEO Rajeev Suri will speak at MWC 2017
However what if you could go way, way back?
The Helio P15 packs an octa-core Cortex-A53 processor clocked at 2.2GHz
Samsung claims up to 27-percent higher performance or 40-percent lower power
Preliminary data for October shows another Windows 10 boom
Samsung Galaxy TabPro S - a tablet with the Windows-keyboard
The first Windows-tablet with the 12-inch display Super AMOLED
June 7, 2016 /
Keyboards for iOS
Ten iOS keyboards review
July 18, 2015 /
Samsung E1200 Mobile Phone Review
A cheap phone with a good screen
March 8, 2015 / 4
Creative Sound Blaster Z sound card review
Good sound for those who are not satisfied with the onboard solution
September 25, 2014 / 2
Samsung Galaxy Gear: Smartwatch at High Price
The first smartwatch from Samsung - almost a smartphone with a small body
December 19, 2013 /
HP Slate 7 is a 7-inch Android 4 Tablet PC with good sound
A cost-effective, 7-inch tablet PC from a renowned manufacturer
October 25, 2013 / 4

News Archive



Do you use microSD card with your phone?
or leave your own version in comments