Oracle Gets Nothing in Google Android Lawsuit, Opts for Appeal

Oracle logo Oracle at one time hoped to win as much as $7B USD from Google for its allegedly unauthorized use of certain license-only Java source files. That wouldn't be a bad payday -- in fact it would almost entirely justify the $7.4B USD Oracle paid to acquired Java-maker Sun Microsystems.

But Oracle's sweet dreams quickly became bitter nightmares as a jury ruled that Google was not guilty of the majority of Oracle's copyright or patent infringement claims. Faced with the prospect of a billion dollar settlement shrinking to a couple million dollars, Oracle's lawyers are now spinning their wheels in a last ditch effort to try to jump-start the almost-dead lawsuit.

In Northern District of California (San Francisco) they submitted a request to presiding Judge William Alsup requesting $0 of damages "related to Google’s infringement of Oracle’s copyrights in connection with (1) the rangeCheck code in TimSort.java and ComparableTimSort.java, and (2) the eight decompiled files (seven 'Impl.java' files and one 'ACL' file)."

Judge Alsup seemed somewhat surprised at the apparent surrender from the Oracle legal crew, commenting, "Is there a catch I need to be aware of?"

Well, there was indeed a catch. Oracle is agreeing to toss aside whatever pittance it would have received for the few scraps of infringement the jury tossed its way for a reason. By ending the trial, it will be able to move ahead more quickly to its appeal, where it will challenge the jury's findings on the more major infringement claims.

It if it wins, the case will be sent back before Judge Alsup. According to IDG News service, Oracle attorney Michael Jacobs mustered a quip, telling Judge Alsup and the audience in attendance, "I hope we see you again after an appeal."

Oracle is in a tough spot as it now finds itself having to play offense against Google, while playing defense against Hewlett-Packard which claims that Oracle breached contracts when it dropped support for Intel Itanium architecture. That lawsuit is also tied to the Sun acquisition, as Sun Microsystems (and now Oracle, by proxy) makes the SPARC processor architecture, an Itanium competitor. Oracle denies breaching its contract to favor its new acquisition, but on the surface there's certain somewhat of an appearance that it did precisely that.

Oracle wasn't the only big loser in the Google Java case. The "not guilty" ruling was also a blow to blogger Florian Mueller of FOSS Patents who long claimed that Google would be found guilty and have to pay massive damages. Coincidentally, Mr. Mueller's objectivity was recently called into question when it was revealed he was on Oracle's payroll.

Source: DailyTech

Tags: Android, Google, Java, legal action, Oracle

Comments
Add comment

Your name:
Sign in with:
or
Your comment:


Enter code:

E-mail (not required)
E-mail will not be disclosed to the third party


Last news

 
Consumer group recommends iPhone 8 over anniversary model
 
LTE connections wherever you go and instant waking should come to regular PCs, too
 
That fiction is slowly becoming a reality
 
The Snapdragon 845 octa-core SoC includes the Snapdragon X20 LTE modem
 
Human moderators can help make YouTube a safer place for everyone
 
Google says Progressive Web Apps are the future of app-like webpages
 
All 2018 models to sport the 'notch'
 
The biggest exchange in South Korea, where the BTC/KRW pair is at $14,700 now
The Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017) Review
The evolution of the successful smartphone, now with a waterproof body and USB Type-C
February 7, 2017 /
Samsung Galaxy TabPro S - a tablet with the Windows-keyboard
The first Windows-tablet with the 12-inch display Super AMOLED
June 7, 2016 /
Keyboards for iOS
Ten iOS keyboards review
July 18, 2015 /
Samsung E1200 Mobile Phone Review
A cheap phone with a good screen
March 8, 2015 / 4
Creative Sound Blaster Z sound card review
Good sound for those who are not satisfied with the onboard solution
September 25, 2014 / 2
Samsung Galaxy Gear: Smartwatch at High Price
The first smartwatch from Samsung - almost a smartphone with a small body
December 19, 2013 /
 
 

News Archive

 
 
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      




Poll

Do you use microSD card with your phone?
or leave your own version in comments (4)