Microsoft will have game streaming within 3 years as focus shifts to software

Microsoft logoMicrosoft is renewing its focus on Xbox software and services, according to Xbox chief Phil Spencer speaking to Bloomberg.

The company's original ambition for the Xbox One spanned not just gaming but also a wide range of TV and media capabilities, coupled with a Steam-like download-based distribution model. Sony, in contrast, focused squarely on gaming and had somewhat more powerful hardware to boot. The reaction from the gaming community to Microsoft's plans was hostile, and while the company backtracked both on the media focus and the move away from physical media, the Xbox One has consistently trailed the PlayStation 4's sales.

Microsoft's position was further weakened by a shortage of first-party, exclusive titles. As Nintendo has demonstrated over the years, a solid stable of first-party titles can go a long way toward overcoming hardware weaknesses. But rather than expanding its development efforts, Microsoft has done the reverse: last year it shuttered UK developer Lionhead and Danish developer Press Play.

With the release today of the Xbox One X, the hardware question is resolved squarely in Microsoft's favor; the new console is significantly more powerful both than its predecessor and its major competitor. With this problem out of the way, the time has come for software.

Microsoft Xbox One

Spencer said that the company is going to increase its investment in developing first-party titles, both creating new studios and acquiring existing ones to write Xbox games. But that's not the only thing in the cards, with a richer set of services also planned. In particular, Spencer said that the company is likely to offer some kind of game-streaming service within the next three years.

Microsoft has had ambitions in this area before. The company considered buying cloud-gaming service OnLive—though eventually Sony would do so—and, in 2013, internally tested a cloud-streamed version of Halo 4. Spencer said that cost and quality concerns had prevented Microsoft from offering such a service in the past, but the massive expansion in Azure, with new data centers being built all over the world, has shifted the balance to make a streaming service viable.

Source: Ars Technica

Tags: game consoles, Microsoft, Xbox One

Comments
Add comment

Your name:
Sign in with:
or
Your comment:


Enter code:

E-mail (not required)
E-mail will not be disclosed to the third party


Last news

 
 
Intel was the number 1 ranked supplier with a 9.2% share of the worldwide semiconductor market
 
Improved software will power more accurate facial rec
 
The iMac Pro may have an A10 Fusion processor running it's own iOS
 
Galaxy X already got some certifications
 
The smart speaker is based on an AI virtual assistant
 
You won't have to leave what you're doing to respond to a chat
 
Apple is working with Intel on 5G hardware for future iPhones
The Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017) Review
The evolution of the successful smartphone, now with a waterproof body and USB Type-C
February 7, 2017 /
Samsung Galaxy TabPro S - a tablet with the Windows-keyboard
The first Windows-tablet with the 12-inch display Super AMOLED
June 7, 2016 /
Keyboards for iOS
Ten iOS keyboards review
July 18, 2015 /
Samsung E1200 Mobile Phone Review
A cheap phone with a good screen
March 8, 2015 / 4
Creative Sound Blaster Z sound card review
Good sound for those who are not satisfied with the onboard solution
September 25, 2014 / 2
Samsung Galaxy Gear: Smartwatch at High Price
The first smartwatch from Samsung - almost a smartphone with a small body
December 19, 2013 /
 
 

News Archive

 
 
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  




Poll

Do you use microSD card with your phone?
or leave your own version in comments (4)