Mozilla retires Firefoxs sponsored tiles, hunts for new revenue streams

Mozilla Firefox logoWay back in 2014, Firefox rolled out an unpopular feature to its nightly builds: sponsored tiles on its "new tab" page. The feature, which was opt-in by default, showed ads that were based on your browsing history. Eventually, after a very long beta testing period, the sponsored tiles were loosed upon all 500 million-or-so Firefox users in May this year.

Now, just a few months later, the feature is being retired. Sponsored tiles will continue to appear for the next few months while Mozilla "fulfils its commitments" (i.e. clears out ad inventory), but then they'll be gone entirely. Writing on the official Mozilla blog, vice president Darren Herman explains that, "advertising in Firefox could be a great business, but it isnt the right business for us at this time because we want to focus on core experiences for our users."

Later in the blog post, which was probably published on Friday afternoon in an attempt to dodge the news cycle, Herman repeats the refrain that we've heard many times over the last few years: "We believe that the advertising ecosystem needs to do better ... Mozilla will continue to explore ways to bring a better balance to the advertising ecosystem for everyones benefit, and to build successful products that respect user privacy and deliver experiences based upon transparency, choice and control."

Mozilla retires Firefoxs sponsored tiles, hunts for new revenue streams

In the meantime, Herman says that Mozilla wants to "reimagine content experiences and content discovery in our products." As for what these reimaginations might look like though, we have no idea. Firefox did recently launch on iOS, however, so that's something. Instead of sponsored tiles, maybe the new tab page will somehow suggest new sites for you to visit, based on your browsing history and category selections? Kind of like a mini in-browser Reddit?

Firefox's targeted sponsored tiles always seemed a little out of place for a browser that is essentially predicated on free, libertarian ideals. You can't exactly blame Mozilla for trying, though. Since its inception, Mozilla has been entirely reliant on revenues from search engines. For years, Google paid Mozilla hundreds of millions of dollars to be Firefox's default search engine. In recent years, Mozilla has diversified its search engine defaultsYahoo is now the default in the US, Yandex in Russia, and Baidu in Chinabut according to its 2014 financial report, 98 percent of its revenue still came from these search engine deals. If something dramatic causes those deals to fall through, Mozilla does ideally need another way of making money.

Speaking of which, just like Wikipedia, Mozilla's annual donation drive is currently live: when you open up Firefox, you'll be greeted with a screen that asks you for a donation. If you want to donate money, but the plea doesn't appear in your browser, you can donate directly on the Mozilla website.

Source: Ars Technica

Tags: browsers, Firefox, Mozilla

Add comment

Your name:
Sign in with:
Your comment:

Enter code:

E-mail (not required)
E-mail will not be disclosed to the third party

Last news

Pokemon GO had the potential to net $1 billion a year
The report said that Hon Hai has invested about US$600 million in India
Market research firm IDC reports that in the third quarter of this year
Customers will only have to shell out 50% of the cost of their Galaxy S7 device
New flagship will launch in 2017
Patent hints at name of the upcoming Surface AIO
IBM, Globalfoundries and Samsung have chosen to use extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light to pattern transistors
Samsung Galaxy TabPro S - a tablet with the Windows-keyboard
The first Windows-tablet with the 12-inch display Super AMOLED
June 7, 2016 /
Keyboards for iOS
Ten iOS keyboards review
July 18, 2015 /
Samsung E1200 Mobile Phone Review
A cheap phone with a good screen
March 8, 2015 / 4
Creative Sound Blaster Z sound card review
Good sound for those who are not satisfied with the onboard solution
September 25, 2014 / 2
Samsung Galaxy Gear: Smartwatch at High Price
The first smartwatch from Samsung - almost a smartphone with a small body
December 19, 2013 /
HP Slate 7 is a 7-inch Android 4 Tablet PC with good sound
A cost-effective, 7-inch tablet PC from a renowned manufacturer
October 25, 2013 / 4

News Archive



Do you use microSD card with your phone?
or leave your own version in comments